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Homemade Holiday Dog Treats

Happy Holidays! Food is definitely front and center at a lot of events at this time of year. Of course, our canine companions always pay very close attention when we’re cooking or eating something delicious. If you like baking, why not make your pup some snacks? Here, a Hyattsville, MD vet lists some great homemade treats for dogs.

Doggy Eggnog

You can make Fido his very own version of this holiday classic by combining sodium-free broth with plain yogurt and a jar of organic baby food. Add an egg, and pour it in a blender to froth it. Top it with a doggy biscuit.

Pumpkin Bites

Pumpkin is actually very good for dogs! Combine pureed pumpkin with natural peanut butter, an egg, and whole-wheat flour. Mix into a batter, and then use a cookie cutter to divide into individual portions. Bake for 30 minutes at 350.

Muttloaf

There actually aren’t many differences between Fido’s meatloaf and one you may make yourself. The main thing is that you’ll want to skip garlic, onions, scallions, and/or chives, as these aren’t good for dogs. Combine minced beef with peas, carrots, pureed tomatoes, parsley, eggs, parmesan cheese, and whole-wheat breadcrumbs. Cook for 40 minutes at 350.

Dog Treats

There are many ways to make dog biscuits. You may want to try a few different versions, and see what Fido likes best. For a base, you can use yogurt, wheat germ, organic baby food, yogurt, peanut butter, pureed pumpkin, pureed liver, mashed bananas, or sodium free broth. Combine two or even three of these items. Then, you can add plain, boneless chicken, fish, or beef; cheese; egg; bacon bits; liver powder; canned chicken or tuna; safe fruits and veggies; or other options. Cook at 375 for 15 minutes or until done.

Tips

These are just a few ‘pawsible’ options. You’ll find many more online. You can also mix and match, or make your own. Just stick to ingredients that are safe for dogs. As mentioned above, garlic, onions, scallions, and chives are unsafe. Some other dangerous foods include chocolate; nuts, especially macadamia nuts, raisins, grapes, and currants; pitted fruits, especially avocado; caffeine; alcohol; meat on the bone; raw meat, dough, or yeast; and anything containing xylitol. Ask your vet for more information.

Happy Holidays from all of us here at Brentwood Animal Hospital, your Hyattsville, MD animal clinic. Please contact us anytime!

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